Exhibitions

Beit Theresienstadt museum exhibits exhibitions that are combined with the educational curricula and offers group instructions on site. Individual visitors can explore the exhibits independently.

Theresienstadt Ghetto 1941-1945 - The Historical Exhibition

An exhibition based on original exhibits from the ghetto period, and which describes the history of the Theresienstadt Ghetto. The building hosting the exhibition was designed by architect Albin Glaser, who survived the ghetto. Its walls are coated with rectangular red bricks that resemble the walls of the ghetto, forming a 12-side polygon building. The mosaic floor, covering an area of ​​more than 80 square meters, describes the map of the town of Terezin, which became a ghetto during the Second World War.

The exhibition presents various topics from ghetto life - the Jewish leadership, the transports, daily life and more.

The exhibition's exhibits include a children's theater puppet prepared in the ghetto, children's diaries, paintings by artists, posters of shows and useful daily life objects.

 

Terezin league - Sports and Youth in Theresienstadt Ghetto

The exhibition "Terezin league - Sports and Youth in Theresienstadt" describes the story of the soccer league played at Theresienstadt ghetto and its players, against the background of the development of Jewish sport before World War II, as part of the daily culture of the Jews of Central Europe. The fact that sport played an important role in the cultural experience also granted it a place in the extensive cultural activity that existed in the ghetto, along with the educational, musical and artistic activities, to the extent permitted by the Germans. These activities were utilized for propaganda purposes by the Germans.

The exhibition includes videos that include the soccer game filmed in the ghetto as part of the Nazi propaganda film of 1944, testimonies of survivors who played and watched the league's games, pictures from the ghetto period and before the war, objects from the ghetto's sports life, diaries, newspaper clippings and drawings of youth and adults documenting the activity and its influence on the youth in the ghetto.

The exhibition emphasizes the educational and ethical significance of sport under the difficult conditions that prevailed in the ghetto and how through sport educational values ​​were instilled, sanity was maintained and the connection to the world that was lost was kept.

Children of Theresienstadt - "If only I could return to my home"

The exhibition depicts the world of the children of ghetto Theresienstadt and opens with a "window to the ghetto" that presents everyday life through the paintings of a 12 year old girl, Helga Weiss. Helga describes the transports that arrive, the lines for food, the hospital room and other episodes.

In front of the entrance there's the residential building model, built by Georg Lauscher, a survivor of the ghetto who contributed greatly to the establishment of the archive at Beit Theresienstadt.

The viewer learns about the children's thoughts, fears and distress through drawings, letter quotations, diaries and essays. Video clips screened on a monitor show survivors telling their personal experiences from that period.

The amazing educational project that took place in the ghetto is presented through four educating figures. Since teaching children was forbidden by the Germans, the educational activity in the ghetto was based mainly on various kinds of art, with an emphasis on moral values, mutual aid, Judaism and Zionism. The exhibition features children's works, as well as the Brundibar opera, in which many children participated.

A wooden relief engraved with the caption "Returning to the Land of Our Fathers" is the exhibit that completes the exhibition, while expressing the hope and continuity of the establishment of the State of Israel

Music and study room

Beit Theresienstadt's review and library room presents a modest exhibition relating to music in the ghetto. A few of the composers and performers in the ghetto, such as Victor Ullmann, Hans Krása, Karel Švenk, Rafael Schächter and Gideon Klein, are presented in the exhibition. In addition the exhibition also includes items from Beit Theresienstadt archive relating to music in the ghetto, such as music sheets and posters.

The room hosts a piano donated by the late Hanan Bachrich, survivor of the ghetto, and a multimedia system for displaying and playing the digital material collected in the archive.

 

Theresienstadt Ghetto 1941-1945 - The Historical Exhibition



An exhibition based on original exhibits from the ghetto period, and which describes the history of the Theresienstadt Ghetto. The building hosting the exhibition was designed by architect Albin Glaser, who survived the ghetto. Its walls are coated with rectangular red bricks that resemble the walls of the ghetto, forming a 12-side polygon building. The mosaic floor, covering an area of ​​more than 80 square meters, describes the map of the town of Terezin, which became a ghetto during the Second World War.

The exhibition presents various topics from ghetto life - the Jewish leadership, the transports, daily life and more.

The exhibition's exhibits include a children's theater puppet prepared in the ghetto, children's diaries, paintings by artists, posters of shows and useful daily life objects.

Terezin league - Sports and Youth in Theresienstadt Ghetto



The exhibition "Terezin league - Sports and Youth in Theresienstadt" describes the story of the soccer league played at Theresienstadt ghetto and its players, against the background of the development of Jewish sport before World War II, as part of the daily culture of the Jews of Central Europe. The fact that sport played an important role in the cultural experience also granted it a place in the extensive cultural activity that existed in the ghetto, along with the educational, musical and artistic activities, to the extent permitted by the Germans. These activities were utilized for propaganda purposes by the Germans.

The exhibition includes videos that include the soccer game filmed in the ghetto as part of the Nazi propaganda film of 1944, testimonies of survivors who played and watched the league's games, pictures from the ghetto period and before the war, objects from the ghetto's sports life, diaries, newspaper clippings and drawings of youth and adults documenting the activity and its influence on the youth in the ghetto.

The exhibition emphasizes the educational and ethical significance of sport under the difficult conditions that prevailed in the ghetto and how through sport educational values ​​were instilled, sanity was maintained and the connection to the world that was lost was kept.

 

Children of Theresienstadt - "If only I could return to my home"



The exhibition depicts the world of the children of ghetto Theresienstadt and opens with a "window to the ghetto" that presents everyday life through the paintings of a 12 year old girl, Helga Weiss. Helga describes the transports that arrive, the lines for food, the hospital room and other episodes.

In front of the entrance there's the residential building model, built by Georg Lauscher, a survivor of the ghetto who contributed greatly to the establishment of the archive at Beit Theresienstadt.

The viewer learns about the children's thoughts, fears and distress through drawings, letter quotations, diaries and essays. Video clips screened on a monitor show survivors telling their personal experiences from that period.

The amazing educational project that took place in the ghetto is presented through four educating figures. Since teaching children was forbidden by the Germans, the educational activity in the ghetto was based mainly on various kinds of art, with an emphasis on moral values, mutual aid, Judaism and Zionism. The exhibition features children's works, as well as the Brundibar opera, in which many children participated.

A wooden relief engraved with the caption "Returning to the Land of Our Fathers" is the exhibit that completes the exhibition, while expressing the hope and continuity of the establishment of the State of Israel

 

Music and study room



Beit Theresienstadt's review and library room presents a modest exhibition relating to music in the ghetto. A few of the composers and performers in the ghetto, such as Victor Ullmann, Hans Krása, Karel Švenk, Rafael Schächter and Gideon Klein, are presented in the exhibition. In addition the exhibition also includes items from Beit Theresienstadt archive relating to music in the ghetto, such as music sheets and posters.

The room hosts a piano donated by the late Hanan Bachrich, survivor of the ghetto, and a multimedia system for displaying and playing the digital material collected in the archive.